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Technical/Modifications

Talk about updating & modifying older speakers and other technical/electronic information here.


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  1. Jubilee Schematic for passive crossover 1 2

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  2. Klipschorn slightly curved top

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  3. RT-10 / RT-12 REPAIR BLOG 1 2 3 4 7

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  • Recent Posts

    • Whether folks on here like it or not, it's a fact that tubes ARE more coloured and DO produce more distortion - it's not an opinion, it's a fact. Whether you like the sound of tubes is another matter, I've been there; it totally depends on your speakers. Also, with using tubes there are so so many variables. Tubies go on and on about 'tube rolling'! WtF is that about. If SS owners could as easily change their output devices, there'd be another forum on that! Like a stylus, a tube wears out, and wears so slowly that you don't notice it until it fails or you replace with a new(er) one. I don't like variables or unknowns in equipment, so I now stay with SS. I acknowledge that tube amps do have something, and when I say that to peole they say yes, distortion, which is correct, but with the right speaker, they can sound,,,, I resist saying better, but, different. I have a SS amp driving my Magnepan (yes, not Klipsch) 1.7i's, and Jazz sounds wonderful, in the room real, and several of my Jazz musician friends also think so too. Amps and speakers are a pairing, and should be thought of as such, and one is chosen with the other in mind.
    • Thinking about getting old, you should listen to John Prine's 'Hello in There'.
    • . I've been a bit suprised at how good of singers rappers are.
    • I'd also like to relate that when I'm at the library studying the internet on my PC while listening to the YouTube on earbuds, I have to remember to click on my plug in equalizer app, it greatly improves the sound.   At home on the room stereo, don't use the digital equalizer, greatly prefer the analog knobs bass and treble.  Don't move them often, but sometimes a source change demands adjustment.
    • The S-993A. I bought mine on Amazon almost two years ago but it is not available there now. Ebay has them but like everything the price has gone up. Actually the price is the same but one has to pay $30 shipping from China. Not recommending from any seller but like this. https://www.ebay.com/itm/224556151192?hash=item344896f198:g:FOoAAOSw5UxhB3RD  There is a learning curve to properly use one.     Solder wick with some added flux works well too for boards but when you learn how to use the gun it is a time saver when restoring old receivers, replacing old caps, etc. 
    • Still feeling my way around all the crossovers and tweaks to them, but believe the earlier crossovers on boards with a terminal strip lend themselves easily to tweaks or upgrades.   The later crossovers with steeper slopes and on much smaller cramped printed circuit boards not so much.
    • Could not agree more, thanks for all the valuable points.
    • Provided that a loudspeaker or a hi-fi system has "in itself" the right set up, I was always a friend of tone control on the amp or preamp. All the amps without tone control pretend "more authenticity, more resolution, more transparency" etc.. This does not have to be a contradiction. If one wants, he/she can buy an amp where you can even bypass the tone control. I would not want to do without it. I think that since the 1950s the invention of the "loudness" button was a direct answer to the Fletcher-Munson curve. It was a nice and logical attempt, but I personally have not been able to make friends with the "loudness" button on any device. Most of the time this curve did not match the real conditions. However, there are devices where you can freely adjust the "loudness" curve to the volume played. I'm always satisfied when I simply have bass and treble controls, or additional mid-range controls as in the past with Marantz receivers or a "tilt" adjuster as with Quad pre amps. I'm talking about analog tone control.   Funnily enough, in recent years the hifi mainstream has often tipped from the "purist" pre amps without any tone control into the opposite. The marketing has rushed to the possibilities of digital tone control. Not to be confused with the need for a DSP e.g. in a crossover where the settings are part of the system set up. What I mean is that consumers are once again getting e.g. knobs like they used to be in the former analog world. My parents had a big mono radio with built in drivers in the early 1960s. When I was learning to read I was quite fascinated about what was written on many buttons: jazz, classical, church, easy listening, big band, radio drama and more (rock music didn't exist yet🙃 So similar it is today again in digital with e.g. Yamaha receivers but more addressed to the „feel of room“ like concert hall 1 and 2, club atmosphere, live concert etc.
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